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Fruit Orchards

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Fruit Orchards

Fire Blight

Long Cuttings

Truly Rooted Trees

Truly rooted Trees -
a chance against Fire Blight ?

Dr. Friedhelm Berger  (berger.friedhelm.dr.lindenhof@t-online.de)

If truly rooted trees would be planted in fruit orchards, the influence of the base and base-sickness would vanish. And should a tree be infected with fire blight it could recover from its own root system.

In many cases growers have remarked that such tree cannot be justified because of their long juvenility. The argument is based on comparison with seedlings even though Thibault and Hermann showed 1982 that autovegetatively propagated pears deliver the same yield as pear grafted on quince.

These are trees grown from short cuttings which need some 4-5 years to reach the generative phase. Similar results can be reviewed with Carrera, Gomez-Aparisi and Stanica et al. in 2000. (refer to literature).

Since Wolfgang Huhn and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Spethmann at the Leibnitz University Hannover, Institute for Nurseries, have succeeded to root long cuttings of forest trees with a special fogging system by Plantfog I asked both to test this method also with fruit trees.

Then is was 1999 virtually impossible to get long cuttings in Hannover I took some cuttings from my private fruit orchard in Karlsruhe, apple and pear, which bloomed in their first year.

This experiment shows clearly that the classical opinion of plant physiology - such plant should not be able to flower - is wrong. Not only theoretical ponderings provide results, practical test do!

These experiments have been repeated several times by other researchers (e.g. Dr. Gregor Osterc, University Ljubljana, Slovenia, Institute for Fruit Growing) with the same results.

Such trees would fit into the system recommended by Steiner et al. (2000) against fire blight infection.

Literature:

  1. Steiner P.W. van der Zwet T. Biggs AR (2000)
    www.caf.wvu.edu/kearneysville/disease_descriptions/omblight.htm
  2. Thibault M., Hermann L. (2000) Comportement agronomique de poiries "Williams"
    cultivès sur leurs propres racines. Revue Horticole, 230
  3. Carrera M., Gomez-Aparisi (2000) Peer rootstocks trials.
    ISHS-8th International Pear Symposium, Ferrara-Bologna, Italy 4. - 9. 9. 2000
  4. Stanica F., Dumitrascu M., Peticila A. (2002) Behavior of three pear varieties propagated
    "in vitro" and self-rooted on Tatura Trellis Canopya,
    ISHS-8th International Pear Symposium, Ferrara-Bologna 4.-9.2002 Acta hort 596, 647-650
    www.actahort.org/books/596/596_112.htm
    www.actahort.org/members/showpdf?booknrarnr=596_12
  5. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Spethmann: spethmann@baum.uni-hannover.de
  6. Wolfgang Huhn: rwhuhn@aol.com
  7. Dr Gregor Osterc, Universität Ljubljana (Laibach),
    Institut für Obstbau, SL-1000 Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 1
     

 

Fruit Orchards

Fire Blight

Long Cuttings

Truly Rooted Trees

Fruit Orchards

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last modified MAR 2013
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